We cannot end sex trafficking without addressing demand

From a guest post on forbes.com by Sarah Godoy, an anti-trafficking researcher and Professor at UCLA:

Public discourse condemning commercial sexual exploitation has largely focused on traffickers, with significantly less attention and accountability placed on the conduct of sex purchasers. Federal legislation, specifically the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, positions traffickers and sex purchasers as equally culpable. Sex purchasers, however, are rarely penalized or even addressed as exploitative, as evidenced by the countless euphemisms, like “Johns” and “hobbyist,” that reinforce an indifference — and almost benevolence — to their behaviors.

Read the full article and learn what you can do to make a difference.

 

A hope-filled future for our cities

In the latest episode of our God’s Revolution podcast, we’re talking with Glenn Barth, president and CEO of Good Cities, about how we can help cities experience a future filled with hope.

Good Cities is a community development initiative that advances the gospel of the Kingdom by working with local leaders toward the common good of the city. The mission of Good Cities is to discover, support, and serve vibrant city movements by building processes that create good cities.

Our good friend Reggie McNeal works alongside Glenn in helping community leaders discover the power and collective impact of collaboration. Using the Good City tools, church leaders can help their communities experience God’s common grace in the redemptive features a city has to offer, which in turn leads to the opportunity for people to experience God’s salvation and a future filled with hope.

To listen to the episode, click here.

The key to racial reconciliation is relationship

From left: David Park, Bryan White, Chip Sweney, Tito Ruiz

In the latest episode of the God’s Revolution podcast, we’re talking with four men of different ethnicities, ages, and backgrounds who are modeling a radically different approach to one of the most difficult issues facing our generation in the church: racial reconciliation. You will find their proof of concept in the love, joy, and laughter you hear in this episode.

We hope you will listen closely and decide to follow their model: Look around for someone God has placed in your circle — where you live, work, and play — and strike up a conversation that will give you an opportunity to listen to their story and ask questions to better help you understand what their life is like. Perhaps you’ll invite them to listen to this podcast with you as a way to start a deep conversation that opens the door to true friendship.

Listen to “The Four Hermanos: The key to racial reconciliation” by clicking here.

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