Multiply Justice

She offered the homeless guy a biscuit … and they talked

At its most basic, multiplying justice is a matter of obeying the Spirit’s prompts and reaching out in compassion to someone in need. Anna Keller writes at The Alabama Baptist about one woman’s simple gesture that transformed a homeless man’s life — and her own:

helping_benny_2BIRMINGHAM, Alabama — Brittney Hanvey says she doesn’t quite know what made her pull over to the side of the road back in January to offer a homeless man a biscuit, but that seemingly small act set off a chain of events that are nothing short of miraculous.

Hanvey, a member of First Baptist Church, Montgomery, is a pharmaceutical sales representative, so she spends a lot of time driving around to various doctors’ offices. Every two weeks she visits the same doctor at Princeton Baptist Medical Center in Birmingham and recognized the same homeless man on the street visit after visit.

“There was always this same man out there, wearing a raggedy T-shirt and pants,” Hanvey recalled. “I was always told not to stop for people by the side of the road, because you couldn’t tell if they just wanted drugs.”

But, Hanvey said, one frigid January morning she felt compelled to stop and help the man.

“I was taking a doctor some breakfast, so I had some biscuits in my car, and I had a blanket for some reason too,” she said. “So I stopped and offered him a biscuit and the blanket, and he took both and asked me if I minded sitting and talking for a minute.”

As it turned out, the doctor saw Brittney stop and talk with the man that cold January day. He also was moved to reach out — and offered him a job. The rest of the story is amazing!

Read the rest by clicking here.

Israeli, Palestinian families of slain teens comfort each other

Multiplying justice requires us to rise above tribal identity and embrace Others as our neighbors.

Sigal Samuel writes in the Jewish Daily Forward:

The families of murdered Israeli teen Naftali Fraenkel and murdered Palestinian teen Mohammed Abu Khdeir are drawing comfort from an unexpected source: each other.

Jerusalem mayor Nir Barkat took to Facebook on Sunday to write about an “emotional and special telephone conversation between two families that have lost their sons.” He said that during his visit to the Fraenkel family home, he had a chance to speak to Hussein Abu Khdeir, Mohammed’s father, and express pain at the “barbaric” murder of his son.

Barkat then suggested that Abu Khdeir speak to Yishai Fraenkel, the uncle of Naftali Fraenkel who recently told the press that “the life of an Arab is equally precious to that of a Jew. Blood is blood, and murder is murder, whether that murder is Jewish or Arab.” The two men took Barkat’s advice and comforted one another by telephone.

In a separate visit organized by Rabbi Rafi Ostroff, chair of the religious council of Gush Etzion, Palestinians from the Hebron area showed up at the door of the Fraenkel family, looking to comfort the bereaved.

Asked why they had come, one Palestinian said, “Things will only get better when we learn to cope with each other’s pain and stop getting angry at each other.”

Read the full article by clicking here.

 

Review: Journey into Justice

Über-kind words from our friend Melissa Deming, reviewing Journey into Justice:

melissa[This book] isn’t just for people interested in justice ministries, nor is it solely for those who love missions. Journey into Justice is for all believers who desire to see God’s kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. … The book connects the dots between the gospel and true biblical justice. So, if you’ve ever wondered what social ministries have to do with spiritual realities, you need this book!

[Journey into Justice] is truly a biblical theology of justice, tracing the larger theme of justice throughout the Scriptures beginning with God’s first kingdom in Genesis and culminating in his new kingdom in Revelation. Above all, social justice is about God’s kingdom and his original intent for the people living in it. The book offers full and accessible definitions of popular terms – mercy, justice, repentance, transformation, faith, etc. He carefully roots these concepts in the full context of the biblical story.

This book is about redemptive relationships – with God and with others – as Jesus’ disciples walk in his ways and multiply themselves. Each chapter offers real-life stories of the transformation that comes from God’s justice and the people who pursue it. So, Journey into Justice isn’t a book to brow-beat you into adding another item to your “spiritual check-list.” It’s a book to challenge you to return to the King.

Read the full review by clicking here. If you are a mother who wants to maximize the Mission in her life and family, you should be following Melissa at her excellent blog, hiveresources.com! She’s also the author of Daughters of the King – a 10-week Bible study that helps women find their place in the biblical story.

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: